Ralf Bartenschlager,
Head of Research Group Viral Hepatitis and Liver Cancer at DKFZ Heidelberg DE,
Head of Department Molecular Virology at Heidelberg University Hospital,
Speaker of DFG funded research consortium TRR179 Determinants and Dynamics of Elimination versus Persistence of Hepatitis Virus Infection,

TRR179: A collaborative research network on hepatitis virus persistence and antiviral immunity

Date: 03 March 2021, 10am

https://www.klinikum.uni-heidelberg.de/zentrum-fuer-infektiologie/molecular-virology/about-us/research-teams/ag-bartenschlager

http://www.trr179.de/en/

More info

 

The conference will be held at the Grecotel Kos Imperial, Kos, Greece on May 17-22, 2022.

Organizing committee:
Belinda Parker, Leonidas Platanias, Mathias Müller and Serge Y Fuchs.

The Conference is under the sponsorship of Aegean Conferences, a non-profit educational organization promoting science through focused scientific conferences (www.aegeanconferences.org). Registration will be limited to 80-110 participants for this meeting; therefore, there should be ample opportunities for interactions and discussions.

Please click this link (http://www.aegeanconferences.org/src/App/conferences/view/150) to go to the Aegean Conferences 4th International Conference on Cytokines in Cancer meeting website for further info.

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Thomas Krausgruber receives the Karl Landsteiner Award for Immunological Basic Research of the Austrian Society for Allergology and Immunology (ÖGAI, www.oegai.org) handed over at the Virtual Congress Day December 4th 2020.

The Award Committee of the ÖGAI supported by international reviewers selected Thomas Krausgruber from Christoph Bock’s lab for his work and widely recognized publication in Nature entitled ‘Structural cells are key regulators of organ-specific immune responses’ (https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-020-2424-4). which was supported by funding of the FWF for the SFB. The award in the amount of 4000€ is donated by the Karl Landsteiner & Eisler-Terramare Foundation – Memorial Private Foundation.

Vetmeduni Vienna, January 25th 2021:

Extension of “Monarchies and Hierarchies in Shaping Chromatin Landscapes” Special Research Programme funded by Austrian Science Fund FWF

https://www.vetmeduni.ac.at/en/infoservice/press-releases/presseinformationen-2021/extension-of-monarchies-and-hierarchies-in-shaping-chromatin-landscapes-special-research-programme/

 

Second funding period (2021-2025) for SFB F61 approved in the FWF Board meeting from 23rd to 25th of November 2020.

Summary of the Research Program

The STAT proteins are transcription factors with a central role in cell homeostasis, survival and differentiation. They are activated by the JAK kinases, including TYK2. Dysregulated STATs cause immune- or inflammation-related, metabolic and tumorigenic diseases but how STATs interact with chromatin is unknown. We have compiled a map of chromatin activity for all wildtype STATs, TYK2, oncogenic STAT5B and a kinase-inactive TYK2 mutant in primary immune cells and in structural cells under homeostatic, cytokine-induced and cell-transforming conditions and plan to use it to determine how JAK-STAT exerts its manifold effects.
The SFB groups hypothesise
• STATs and TYK2 cause chromatin remodeling in non-hematopoietic cells, defining their identity and shaping the interface of immune cells and stromal cells in homeostasis and disease (Christoph Bock, Mathias Müller, Birgit Strobl with all other consortium members)
• Homeostatic macrophages use STAT2/IRF9 to prime themselves for activation (Thomas Decker, Sylvia Knapp and Christoph Bock); signals from STAT1,3,5 drive the exit from and the return to homeostasis (Sylvia Knapp, Mathias Müller, Birgit Strobl, Thomas Decker and Christoph Bock)
• STAT5A and STAT5B are not equivalent but drive distinct developmental programs in haematopoietic and leukaemic cells (Veronika Sexl, Heidi Neubauer and Christoph Bock)
• The chromatin signatures of haematopoietic cancers are shaped by oncogenic STAT5, oncogenic STAT3 or a STAT3-CDK6 complex (Veronika Sexl, Heidi Neubauer and Christoph Bock)
• TYK2 determines cell fate by regulating both transcriptional and post-transcriptional processes (Birgit Strobl, Mathias Müller and Christoph Bock with Thomas Decker).

Much of the current work on signal transduction in disease conditions (e.g. during infection, transformation or drug treatment) is based on an outdated understanding of the homeostatic healthy condition. By providing a fine-scale and cell-specific definition, our work will cause a comprehensive (re-)evaluation of the early stages of perturbations and the return to homeostasis. The approach is completely novel and will revolutionize our understanding of cellular memory and the progression/resolution of disease.

Press Release: Vetmeduni Vienna